Returning Students: Course Login
California Driver's Permit, Drivers Education, Lessons, Tests
LOGIN

10. Sharing the Road

Page 1 of 19 Next » Back to Lessons   Quiz  

248
Crosswalks

Every street where streets and sidewalks meet “at about right angles” has a crosswalk for pedestrians to cross the street even though there may be no painted lines. A crosswalk may be marked by white lines at an intersection but if not marked, one exists and is the extension of sidewalks across the streets unless pedestrian crossing is prohibited by signs.

Although most crosswalks are marked with white lines, Yellow lines may be painted for school crossings. Although most crosswalks are at corners, they are sometimes in the middle of the block. Some crosswalks, especially in residential areas, are not marked.

Although pedestrians have the right-of-way in crosswalks, they must only cross when it is safe to do so. You must always obey traffic signals as a pedestrian. Many intersections have signals which show the words “ WALK “ and “ DON’T WALK “ or show a person walking in white and a raised hand in orange. Whether it has these signals or the usual traffic lights, you must obey the pedestrian rules.

The “WALK” or walking person appears when it is legal to start crossing. When the “DON’T WALK” or raised hand appears, you may not start across the street.

In order to operate pedestrian signals, you may need to push a button one time to receive the “WALK” or walking person signal. When a signal first changes to “WALK” or the walking person for you, look left, right, and then left again before crossing the street. Yield the right-of-way to any vehicle in the intersection before the signal changed.

Flashing “DON’T WALK” or raised hand signals mean you should not begin to cross because you may not have enough time to make it to the other side of the street before vehicles start moving across your path. If the flashing “DON’T WALK” or raised hand signals appear after you have already started to cross the roadway, you may finish crossing the street.

Remember that you must obey all traffic signs and signals when crossing the street. Check for vehicles that appear to be unlikely to stop and never forcibly claim the right-of-way from a vehicle. At signal-controlled intersections where there are no pedestrian signals, pedestrians must obey the red, yellow, or green signal lights.

When crossing at an intersection controlled by stop signs, you should make sure that drivers see you before you attempt to cross the roadway. Don’t assume that other drivers will stop just because one vehicle has stopped for you. Take turns with approaching vehicles, only crossing the street when all other vehicles have stopped for you.

You must not suddenly leave a curb or other safe place and walk or run into the path of a vehicle which is close enough to be a danger to you. This is true even if you are in a crosswalk.

At an intersection where traffic is not controlled by signals or signs, drivers are required to yield the right-of-way to you within any crosswalk, marked or unmarked. However, you must give the driver a chance to yield to you and not just step off the curb when oncoming vehicles are nearby.

Making eye contact with a driver does not mean that the driver will see you or yield the right-of-way. The law says that any driver must take care for the safety of any pedestrian-- but if the driver can’t stop in time, the law won’t help you.

Crossing a roadway between intersections when a crosswalk is not present is called “jaywalking.” If you “jaywalk” across a street between intersections, where no pedestrian crosswalks are provided, you must yield the right-of- way to all vehicles. Jaywalking is both dangerous and illegal. It is also a significant cause of accidents .

It is illegal to ski, snowboard, or sled on or across any roadway in such a manner as to interfere with the movement of vehicles thereon. Cities, towns, and counties are allowed to adopt local ordinances regulating pedestrians, skateboards, skates, and rollerblading on highways, sidewalks, and roadways.

Lesson Summary


  

Lesson 10 Quiz


You will now answer 5 questions to test what you learned during this lesson. You must answer all questions correctly to receive completion credit for this lesson. You may answer the questions as many times as necessary to get them right.

You should review the lesson material if you don't do well on the quiz.

  1. Pedestrians comprise about what ratio of traffic fatalities?


    1.   
    2.   
    3.   
    4.   


  2. In the United States, a bicyclist is killed:


    1.   
    2.   
    3.   
    4.   


  3. If you fail to stop for a school bus with flashing red lights:


    1.   
    2.   
    3.   
    4.   


  4. The most common collision in a work zone is from:


    1.   
    2.   
    3.   
    4.   


  5. An orange trianglular sign on the back of a vehicle means:


    1.   
    2.   
    3.   
    4.   



  

Page 1 of 19 Next »  Back to Lessons  Quiz  




Start Now! Get your California Drivers Ed Certificate